Bikeshed Documentation

Living Standard,

This version:
https://tabatkins.github.io/bikeshed/
Issue Tracking:
GitHub
Inline In Spec
Editor:
Tab Atkins-Bittner

Abstract

Bikeshed is a spec-generating tool that takes in lightly-decorated Markdown and spits out a full spec, with cross-spec autolinking, automatic generation of indexes/ToC/etc, and many other features.

1. Installing

If you use Bikeshed infrequently, or are okay with requiring a network roundtrip every time you invoke Bikeshed, you probably want to use the Bikeshed API instead. In return, the API version is always up-to-date, so you don’t have to remember to update things yourself.

If you want to run a local copy of Bikeshed rather than use the cgi version, it’s pretty easy to install.

You need to install Python 2.7, PIP, and a few other support libraries before installing Bikeshed itself. Here is how to do this on Debian-based Linuxen (anything using apt), OS X, Windows 7/8/10, or the Termux terminal emulator for Android.

If you already have Virtualenv set up, you can skip directly down to §1.5 Common steps.

1.1. Linux steps

$ sudo apt-get install python2.7 python-dev python-pip python-wheel libxslt1-dev libxml2-dev

The apt-get command works on Debian-based systems like Ubuntu; if you work on some other type of system, and can figure out how to get things working on your own, let me know and I’ll add instructions for your system.

Then, we’ll need to install lxml and Pygments.

$ sudo pip install pygments
$ sudo pip install lxml

Important: If this command reports that you already have lxml, instead run:

$ sudo pip install lxml --upgrade

That’ll spew a lot of console trash, but don’t worry about it.

In some installations you’ll need to also upgrade setuptools for html5lib's entertainment:

$ sudo pip install lxml setuptools --upgrade

From here, you can proceed to §1.5 Common steps.

1.2. OS X steps

Note: If you’re on a relatively modern Mac you should be able to proceed directly to §1.5 Common steps.

These instructions assume that you have Mac Ports or Homebrew installed. If you successfully install Bikeshed using some other method, please contribute to this documentation.

1.2.1. Mac ports

First, get the right packages installed onto your system:

sudo port install python27 py27-pip py27-lxml py27-html5lib py27-cssselect py27-libxslt py27-libxml2 py27-pygments

Then, activate the python version you just installed as the one the system should use:

sudo port select --set python python27

(If you get ImportError: No module named six when you first run Bikeshed, additionally run sudo port install py27-six.)

1.2.2. Homebrew

Install the Homebrew version of Python and Pip:

brew install python

Install the XCode command-line tools:

xcode-select --install

Install or update lxml and Pygments.

$ pip install pygments lxml --upgrade

That’ll spew a lot of console trash, but don’t worry about it.

1.2.3. All Macs

After doing the previous commands specific to your subsystem, you can proceed to §1.5 Common steps.

Some people on Macs have reported problems with the six library upon first running Bikeshed.

If you get the error ImportError: cannot import name viewkeys when you try to run Bikeshed the first time, run sudo pip install --ignore-installed six to upgrade it to the latest version.

1.3. Windows steps

Tested on Windows 7, 8/8.1 & 10

  1. Install the latest Python 2.7.

  2. Run the following in an elevated command prompt (change the path if your location is different)

    setx /m PATH "%PATH%;C:\Python27;C:\Python27\Scripts"
    
  3. If using Python 2.7.8 or older, install PIP by saving get-pip.py and just double clicking the file.

From here, you can proceed to §1.5 Common steps.

1.4. Android + Termux steps

This is how to set up bikeshed on your android phone or tablet using Termux.

  1. Install Termux from Google Play or F-Droid.

  2. Install python, git, a c compiler, and the native dependencies:

    $ apt install python2 python2-dev clang libxml2-dev libxslt-dev git
    
  3. Install the Python dependencies:

    $ pip2 install pygments lxml --upgrade
    

From here, you can proceed to §1.5 Common steps.

1.5. Common steps

With the dependencies in place, you can now install the Bikeshed repository itself. Run the following in your favorite command line:

$ git clone https://github.com/tabatkins/bikeshed.git

(This’ll download bikeshed to a bikeshed folder, created wherever you’re currently at. If you think you might want to commit back to Bikeshed, instead download it over SSH. I won’t explain how to do that here.)

Finally, run:

In a Virtualenv environment:

(venv) $ pip install --editable /path/to/cloned/bikeshed
(venv) $ bikeshed update

For Linux/OSX (Omit the sudo for OSX under Homebrew):

$ sudo pip install --editable /path/to/cloned/bikeshed
$ bikeshed update

On Windows:

$ python -m pip install --editable /path/to/cloned/bikeshed
$ bikeshed update

On Termux:

$ pip2 install --editable /path/to/cloned/bikeshed
$ bikeshed update

This’ll install Bikeshed, making it available to your Python environment as the bikeshed package, automatically add a bikeshed command to your path, and then update your data files to the latest versions.

(If anything doesn’t work in here, let me know and I’ll fix it. These instructions have worked for a lot of people on all OSes, but it’s possible that you’ll run into a new error, because computers are terrible.)

1.6. Updating Bikeshed

To update bikeshed to its latest version at any time, just enter Bikeshed’s folder and run:

$ git pull --rebase
$ bikeshed update

This’ll pull the latest version of Bikeshed, and ensure that you’re looking at the latest version of the data files, rather than whatever stale version is currently sitting in the repo.

1.7. Travis CI steps

To use bikeshed on Travis CI's github integration, you’ll need the following .travis.yml commands:

sudo: false
language: python
python:
  - "2.7"
install:
  - git clone https://github.com/tabatkins/bikeshed.git
  - pip install --editable $PWD/bikeshed
  - bikeshed update
script:
  # Invoke bikeshed here, at your own leisure. E.g.:
  - bikeshed spec

2. Invoking Bikeshed Without Installing

While a locally-installed Bikeshed does provide additional functionality, if all you need to do is process a spec, there is an API server you can talk to, maintained by Peter Linss.

2.1. Using Curl

These instructions assume use of the curl command, but you can use any equivalent "talk HTTP at a server" command you might have access to.

curl https://api.csswg.org/bikeshed/ -F file=@index.bs -F force=1 > index.html

This illustrates the basic, most common usage. Swap out index.bs and index.html for the input/output filenames you’re using.


curl https://api.csswg.org/bikeshed/ -F file=@index.bs -F output=err

This command, instead, just outputs the error messages, if any. It’s usually good to run this first, to see if you’re doing things correctly.


curl https://api.csswg.org/bikeshed/ -F url=http://example.com/my-spec/index.bs -F force=1 > index.html

And if your spec is hosted online already, this command invokes the processor on it. It’s otherwise identical to the first command.


curl https://api.csswg.org/bikeshed/ -F file=@Issues.txt -F input=issues > Issues.html

And if you’re using Bikeshed to maintain a W3C Disposition of Comments, this command invokes the issues-list command from §3.9 bikeshed issues-list.

2.2. Using the Web Form

Alternately, you can just visit https://api.csswg.org/bikeshed/ directly, and upload a file, point to a URL, or directly paste in your spec source.

It defaults to outputting both the HTML and the errors, but you can switch it to one or the other only if you want.

3. Invoking Bikeshed Locally

Locally-installed Bikeshed is invoked via the command-line. There’s a bunch of options, but you’ll only use a few in day-to-day use.

3.1. Global Options

There are a few options that apply to many different options, so they’re specified before the individual commands:

-h or --help

Shows the help message for the current command. Can be run without any command, like bikeshed -h to show the list of valid commands and the global flags, or after a command, like bikeshed spec -h to show the help text for that command in particular.

-f or --force

A very useful command, -f makes fatal errors non-fatal. Bikeshed’s categorizes errors as "fatal" if they’re clearly mistakes, or will cause some variety of data loss in your spec; regardless, it can generally recover gracefully from them. If you just need to generate a spec quickly, and will fix the error later, -f will let you do that.

It’s also quite useful when fixing a freshly-written (or ported) spec that might have a lot of errors in it; rather than seeing only the very first error, running with -f will show you all the errors, so you can fix them in whatever order you like. (In that case, running with -q or -qq might also be useful, to suppress the non-fatal errors temporarily.)

-q or --quiet

The -q flag suppresses one level of error messages. It can be passed multiple times to suppress additional levels, in the order "warnings", then "link errors", then "fatal errors".

-s or --silent

The -s flag suppresses all console output from Bikeshed, regardless of source. (It’s more powerful than -q, as it’ll also suppresses things like the success/failure message.)

-d or --dry-run

The -d flag prevents Bikeshed from actually writing anything to disk. It does everything else, just skips that final "save" operation.

--print= [ plain | console | markup ]

Specifies how Bikeshed should output its messages. Default is "console", which outputs colored text using console color codes. "plain" outputs the same text as "console", but without any color codes (which look like gibberish if you’re not ouputting to a console). "markup" outputs the text in a light markup structure (suitable for parsing as HTML), for easier parsing of the output by tools.

3.2. bikeshed spec

The spec command is the most common one you’ll use. It turns a Bikeshed source file into an output HTML file. The rest of this document mostly describes how to format a source file for use with this command.

Most of the time you can just run bikeshed spec and things will "just work" as long as your source file has the .bs extension.

Relevant flags:

--gh-token=TOKEN

If you’re using Inline GitHub Issues heavily, you might run into the GitHub rate limit. You can generate an OAuth token at https://github.com/settings/tokens and then pass it to Bikeshed via this flag to raise your limit considerably.

-l or --line-numbers

If you’re having trouble locating the source of an error in your code, run Bikeshed with this flag and almost all errors will report the source line number they appear at (or somewhere very close - it’s per-element).

This code is unfortunately forced to be fairly hacky, and has the potential to lightly corrupt your file (inserting extra debugging info into plain text that just happens to look like markup), so it automatically triggers a dry-run, as if you’d specified --dry-run. When you’re done debugging, just run again without this flag to actually get some output.

After any flags, you can optionally specify the input file path and output file path. Both of these can usually be omitted; if you omit the output file, it’ll just output to a file with the same name as the input file, but with the extension changed to .html; if you omit the input file, it’ll search thru the current directory and assume you want the first file with a Bikeshed extension (.bs).

If you want to feed Bikeshed from stdin or have it output to stdout, just use - as the appropriate filename.

3.3. bikeshed watch

The watch command is identical to the spec command, except it sets up a watcher and auto-rebuilds the spec every time it changes. With this turned on, you can edit with a simple save->refresh cycle, rather than having to do save->build->refresh.

It accepts all the same arguments as spec. (Tho using stdin/stdout might get a little weird.)

Use Ctrl-C to stop the watcher (or whatever key combo kills the currently running process in your console).

3.4. bikeshed template

The template command outputs a minimal "skeleton" document to stdout. It’s useful to get started with Bikeshed, without having to remember what all the required metadata is.

On a Linux-like command line, it should be used like:

$ bikeshed template > index.bs

3.5. bikeshed echidna

The echidna command hooks into the W3C’s Echidna auto-publishing system, letting you publish W3C specs from the command-line, rather than having to go thru a staff contact.

Note: Currently, only Working Drafts (not including FPWD) can be published via Echidna.

It’s invoked similarly to bikeshed spec, with three required flags:

--u USERNAME

Your W3C username

--p PASSWORD

Your W3C password

--d DECISION_URL

A link to a publicly-visible message approving the publication of this draft.

After the flags, you can optionally specify the input file path, just like for bikeshed spec; if omitted, it selects a file automatically in the same way.

Bikeshed then builds the spec normally, performs a little bit of fixup for common issues that PubRules complains about, and submits the spec to Echidna. It will print out a URL for you to check on the progress of your publication; it should complete in a few seconds.

Most likely you’ll have some PubRules errors when you check your progress; fix those (ask in irc.w3.org#pub for help if needed) then just run bikeshed echidna again.

3.5.1. Testing Publication Locally

Publishing via Echidna automatically does some "fixup" on your document, to fix some common errors that would make the doc fail the W3C’s PubRules check.

These fixes are controlled by the Prepare For TR metadata, so if you want to see precisely what your spec will look like when it’s published, add that to your metadata block manually.

If you want to go further, and see the actual TAR file that will be sent to the Echidna service, you can pass --just-tar to the command (and omit the authentication flags that are normally required). This will cause Bikeshed to create a file named test.tar in your current directory.

3.5.2. Echidna Hooks

Bikeshed’s default publication behavior is usually sufficient, but if you need to customize it in some way, there are a few hooks you can use (assuming you can write Python). In an include file named bs-extensions.include, provide an implementation of the following methods (check the default version of this file for the default implementations, for the methods you don’t want to change):

BSPrepTR(doc)

This method is called after processing is done, when the document is ready to be packed up and sent to Echidna. Here, you can perform whatever final post-processing is required.

For example, the CSSWG EDs link to a stylesheet in the parent directory of the server they’re stored on. In their BSPrepTR(), they search for the link to that stylesheet, and update it to point to the current directory instead.
BSPublishAdditionalFiles(files)

This method allows you to specify what files should be included in the publishing bundle. It must return an array of additional files/folders; each entry must either be a string, referring to a file/folder in the spec’s directory or subdirectories, or a tuple of 2 strings, the first of which points to a file outside the spec’s directory, and the second of which provides the path the file should have within the spec’s directory.

The files value provides the default values, which you probably want to just extend, rather than fully replace. It defaults to ["images", "diagrams", "examples"], indicating that those folders, if present, will be included.

For example, as stated in the example for BSPrepTR(), the CSSWG needs to include its stylesheet in with its specs. To do so, it just needs to add the entry ["../default.css", "default.css"] to the files array, indicating that Bikeshed should grab the default.css file from the parent directory, and put it in the spec’s directory (in the bundle) with the same name.

3.6. bikeshed update

The update command updates Bikeshed’s datafiles, which it uses for autolinking and similar things. By default it’ll update all of its datafiles, but if you want to update only particular ones, you can pass any or all of the following flags:

3.7. bikeshed refs

The refs command lets you search Bikeshed’s anchor database, letting you see what sort of things it’s looking at when doing autolinking. This can be very useful for debugging, or just for a quick check of where something is defined.

It’s flags are similar to the attributes used on autolinks:

Any or all of these flags can be specified, and Bikeshed will display all the refs it can find matching the criteria.

3.8. bikeshed source

The source command applies various transformations to the source document itself, rather than producing a separate output document. Its options are described in §12 Source-File Processing: bikeshed source.

3.9. bikeshed issues-list

The issues-list command processes a plain-text document in an "issues-list" format pioneered by the CSSWG into an equivalent HTML version.

Relevant flags:

After the command you can pass the input and output filenames. As usual, one or both can be omitted: if you omit the output, it’ll write to a file with the same name as the input, but a .html extension; it you omit the input, it will look in the current folder for any files starting with "issues" and ending in ".txt", and then extract the digits from those filenames and select the one with the largest number. If you name your file as suggested above, with an ISO date, it’ll correctly always choose the latest issues list.

Define the issues-list format. The -t output is already more than enough to actually work with, but it would still be good to describe it more fully.

4. Metadata

Crucial to the processor’s ability to automatically generate most of a spec’s boilerplate is a small metadata section, typically located at the top of a file.

A metadata block is just a <pre class='metadata'> element, with contents like:

Status: ED
TR: http://www.w3.org/TR/css-variables/
ED: http://dev.w3.org/csswg/css-variables/
Shortname: css-variables
Level: 1
Editor: Tab Atkins Jr., Google, http://xanthir.com/contact
Editor: Daniel Glazman, Disruptive Innovations, daniel.glazman@disruptive-innovations.com
Abstract: This module introduces cascading variables as a new primitive value type that is accepted by all CSS properties,
	and custom properties for defining them.

The syntax of a metadata block is very simple - it’s a line-based format, with each line consisting of a key and a value, separated by a colon. Or if you’re adding multiple lines with the same key, you can just start the subsequent lines with whitespace to have it reuse the last-seen key.

Several keys are required information, and will cause the processor to flag an error if you omit them:

There are several additional optional keys:

Note: A boolish value is a string representing a boolean value (true or false). The string "yes", "on", "true", and "y" all represent true values, while the strings "no", "off", "false", and "n" all represent false values.

You can also provide custom keys with whatever values you want, by prefixing the key with !, like !Issue Tracking: in spec. Any custom keys are collected together and formatted as entries in the "spec metadata" boilerplate dl. Specifying a custom key multiple times will put all the values as dds under a single dt for the key. A custom key name equal to one of the auto-generated keys will add your custom value as an additional dd under that auto-generated key.

Some of the metadata keys are deprecated; you shouldn’t use them, but just in case you run into them in the wild, they’re documented here for understanding. Each one recommends what you should be using instead.

4.1. Default Metadata

To specify default metadata for all specs generated for a given group and/or spec status, add an appropriate defaults.include file to the bikeshed/boilerplate/ folder. This file must be a JSON file, with the keys and values all strings matching the above descriptions.

Here’s an example file:

{
	"Mailing List": "www-style@w3.org",
	"Mailing List Archives": "http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/"
}

4.2. Computing Metadata From Other Metadata

If your Group produces several specs, and they all share some formulaic metadata that could be auto-generated with a bit of string-replacement, you can achieve this automatically with a "computed-metadata.include" file in the bikeshed/boilerplate/ folder. It has the exact same syntax as the defaults.include file, except that you can use text macros in the file, based on all the previous metadata (defaults, <pre class=metadata>, and command-line overrides).

Note: Don’t forget about custom text macros with the Text Macro metadata, if none of the pre-defined ones give you the substitution strings you need.

Note: By necessity from the definition, these metadata override all previous metadata. Make sure that everything you set in this file is really something that every single spec in your Group should have.

4.3. Overriding Metadata From The Command Line

If you want to generate multiple versions of a spec from the same source (such as a primary spec, plus some snapshots), you can override the metadata from the command line to generate the alternate forms.

For any metadata key defined above, just pass it as a --md-foo=bar command-line argument. For example, to override the Status metadata, run bikeshed spec --md-status=ED.

(If the metadata name has spaces in it, use dashes to separate the words instead.)

4.3.1. Known Issues

  1. You can’t override the Use <i> Autolinks status, because you can’t input the <> characters. I don’t intend to fix this, as you shouldn’t be specifying this in the first place.

  2. You can’t supply custom metadata keys (ones with a ! prefix). If you want to do this, let me know, and I’ll work on it.

  3. Passing values with spaces in them is tricky. This is an issue with the argparse library. The only way around it is to specify both of the positional arguments (the input and output filenames), then put the offending argument after them.

5. Markup Shortcuts

Bikeshed’s source format is roughly HTML, but it allows you to omit or shorten several verbose/annoying parts of the language, reducing the amount of format noise in the spec source, making it easier to read and write.

5.1. Markdown

Bikeshed currently recognizes most of Markdown.

In particular, it recognizes all of the Markdown "block elements" except for indented code blocks:

If the Markup Shorthands: markdown yes metadata is specified, it also recognizes several of the Markdown "inline elements":

It does not recognize "autolinks" (surrounded by <> characters), images, or "hard line breaks"; use HTML for these. It also does not recognize "link references" (defining the link location elsewhere, and referring to it by reference instead).

In addition to standard (CommonMark) Markdown, Bikeshed also recognizes definition lists, with the following format:

Here’s the dl syntax:

: key
:: val
: key 1
: key 2
:: more vals

For all three list formats, on the rare occasions you need to add a class or attribute to the list, you can wrap it in the appropriate list container, like:

<ol class=foo>
	1. first
	2. second
</ol>

Bikeshed will use the container you provided, rather than generating a fresh one like it does by default.

Bikeshed also supports adding IDs to headings, via the Markdown Extra syntax:

Header 1 {#header1}
========

### Header 2 ### {#header2}

More of Markdown will be supported in the future, as I get closer to adhering to the CommonMark specification.

5.2. Notes, Issues, Examples, Advisements

The Markdown processor specially recognizes paragraphs starting with "Issue: ", "Advisement: ", "Assertion: ", "Note: ", or "Note, ", and will add a matching class to the paragraph automatically. These classes default to .issue, .advisement, .assertion, and .note, but can be customized with the metadatas Issue Class, Advisement Class, Assertion Class, and Note Class. (However, the default classes receive styling from the default stylesheet, so make sure you provide your own styling if you change them.)

The default styling of these blocks includes a generated-content "header" containing the word "NOTE:", etc. If you’d like to provide your own custom header, write out the container element yourself (rather than using the Markdown shorthand, just create any element with the appropriate class), and add a heading="YOUR TEXT HERE" attribute to the container. It will automatically have "NOTE: "/etc prepended to it. (This is used by §5.10 Remote Issues to put the GitHub issue title on the issue containers.)

Elements with the .example class will also be given a generated-content "header" in the format EXAMPLE n with an auto-incrementing number, and have self-links created to allow linking directly to the example.

5.3. Typography Fixes

Bikeshed will automatically handle a few typographic niceties for you, ones that it can reliably detect:

There are several autolink shortcuts that make autolinks much shorter to write, such as 'foo' to link to a CSS property or descriptor, or {{foo}} to link to an IDL construct. These are documented in §7 Autolinking.

Other types of linking shorthand also exist, such as [[#foo]] to link to sections of a spec (documented in §7.5 Section Links), or [[FOO]] to link to generate and link to bibliography entries (documented in §8 Bibliography).

5.4.1. Autolink Shortcuts That Work Anywhere: the l element

The autolink shorthands don’t work in elements like pre, because it’s too easy for code constructs to look like autolinks. You can still manually write out your autolink as an a element, but that can be much more verbose than the terse syntax that the shorthands provide. (For example, {{Foo/bar()}} vs <a method for=Foo>bar()</a>.)

You can avoid this by using the l element, and putting an autolink shorthand inside of it, like <l>{{Foo/bar()}}</l>. This will autolink exactly the same as normal, but works anywhere in your document. Extra bonus: it will recognize all the autolinking syntaxes, even if you have some turned off with the Markup Shorthands metadata.

Note: Currently the CSS value autolinking syntax (''foo'') does not work.

The l element itself is removed from the document and replaced by the autolink, but if you specify any attributes on the l, they’ll be transferred to the generated a. In particular, this is useful for specifying linking attributes that can’t be specified by the shorthand, like the spec to search for, that would otherwise require converting all the way to a manual a autolink.

5.5. var and Algorithms

The var element (or its shorthand equivalent, |foo|) is often used to mark up "arguments" to a prose algorithm. Bikeshed explicitly recognizes this, and has several features related to this.

Algorithms can be explicitly indicated in your markup by putting the algorithm="to foo a bar" attribute on a container element or a heading. All vars within an algorithm are "scoped" to that algorithm.

Generally, vars are used at least twice in an algorithm: once to define them, and at least once to actually use them for something. If you use a var only once, there’s a good chance it’s actually a typo. Bikeshed will emit a warning if it finds any vars used only once in an algorithm. If this singular usage is correct, you can instruct Bikeshed to ignore the error by adding an ignore attribute to the var itself. (There’s no way to do this with the |foo| syntax; you have to convert it back to an actual var element.)

5.6. Code Blocks (pre, etc)

Bikeshed has several nice features related to "code blocks"—pre, xmp, and sometimes code.

5.6.1. pre whitespace stripping

Using a pre element in HTML is unsatisfying, because it forces you to break your indentation strategy, pulling the content back to the margin edge (or else employing silly hacks with comments and explicit newlines). The preprocessor fixes this.

Whenever a pre element is encountered, the processor records how much whitespace precedes the first line, and then strips that much whitespace from it and all following lines.

Additionally, if the closing </pre> is on its own line, the processor automatically pulls it up onto the end of the previous line, so there’s no final blank line in the content.

In other words, you can now write:

<div class='example'>
  <p>
    An example:

  <pre>
    &lt;ul>
      &lt;li>one
      &lt;li>two
    &lt;/ul>
  </pre>
</div>

The preprocessor will automatically convert it into:

<div class='example'>
  <p>
    An example:

  <pre>
&lt;ul>
  &lt;li>one
  &lt;li>two
&lt;/ul></pre>
</div>

5.6.2. xmp To Avoid Escaping Markup

The xmp element is an old HTML element that’s now deprecated (but still required to be supported). It was intended for markup examples (thus the name), and has magical parsing properties, where its contents (everything until the </xmp> closing tag) are treated as literal text, and not interpreted as HTML. In particular, this means that within an xmp you don’t need to escape your < or & characters.

Bikeshed supports using xmp anywhere a pre can be used; it converts it into a properly-escaped pre in the output to avoid validation errors. For example, the two markup examples in the previous section are using xmp in this document’s source.

Use of xmp is particularly useful for IDL blocks, as IDL uses <foo> syntax for higher-order types (like sequence<DOMString>). If you’re using a pre and don’t remember to escape this, you’ll end up with confusingly-broken IDL, as the <DOMString> part is interpreted as an opening HTML tag. If you use xmp instead, there’s no need to remember to escape anything; you can write or copy raw WebIDL into the block and it’ll be interpreted correctly.

5.6.3. Syntax Highlighting

You can syntax-highlight code blocks. Just add either a highlight="foo" attribute or a lang-foo class to the element, or set a Default Highlight metadata, and the element will automatically be syntax-highlighted according to the "foo" language rules. (Setting no-highlight closer will turn if off for an element; it looks for the closest ancestor with one of the attributes.)

The syntax highlighter uses Pygments, which supports a large set of languages. See http://pygments.org/docs/lexers/ for the full list. (Use one of the "short names" of the language for the "foo" value.)

Bikeshed comes with a default color scheme based loosely on that of Prism.js. If you would like to use your own color scheme, turn off the automatic styles with a Boilerplate: style-syntax-highlighting off metadata, then supply your own.

Note: If you use hightlight=html, script and style elements are automatically highlighted with JS and CSS rules. Normative WebIDL blocks (class=idl) are automatically highlighted, but you can use highlight=idl to highlight non-normative ones.

Note: If your code block already has markup in it, this feature will safely "merge" the highlighting into your existing markup.

5.6.4. Line Numbers

You can automatically generate line numbers for code blocks by adding a line-numbers attribute to the element or an ancestor, or setting the Line Numbers metadata to affect all elements. (Setting no-line-numbers closer will turn it off for an element; it looks for the closest ancestor with one of the attributes). The numbers are added to each line via CSS generated content, so they’ll always stay in sync and won’t get copied when you highlight a chunk of text.

Haikus are easy:
five-seven-five syllables,
spread over three lines.

The lines default to starting at 1; to change that, set the line-start attribute on the element to your desired starting value.

If you would like to produce your own line-numbering CSS, turn off the automatic styles with a Boilerplate: style-line-numbers off metadata, then supply your own.

Note: Similar to syntax highlighting, this feature will safely "merge" the line-numbers markup into your existing markup. The only complication is if the original markup has elements that span more than one line; in this case, the "line" element will expand to cover all the lines spanned by your original markup. It will still put a line marker on the first and last line of this span, so the effect isn’t too noticeable if the original markup only spans two lines.

5.6.5. Highlighting Particular Lines

If you want to bring attention to particular lines in your code snippet, but need to show more surrounding code for context, you can highlight the important ones with a line-highlight attribute.

Another haiku.
This is the important line.
Ignore what’s down here.

The syntax of line-highlight is a comma-separated sequence of either integers (like 5), or integer ranges (like 2-4). For example, line-highlight="2-4, 6" will highlight lines 2, 3, 4, and 6.

Like line-numbers (above), this defaults to considering the first line of the snippet as line 1, but the numbering can be changed with the line-start attribute.

If you would like to produce your own line-highlighting CSS, turn off the automatic styles with a Boilerplate: style-line-highlighting off metadata, then supply your own.

Note: This feature has the same restriction on line-spanning elements as the line-numbers feature does. In particular, if any line being wrapped in a multi-line "line" element is highlighted, the entire "line" element gets highlighted.

5.7. Property/descriptor/element definition table expansion

Propdef tables are rather large, even when correctly formatted. Instead, you can write the table in a simple text format similar to the spec’s metadata block, and let the processor automatically generate a table from it:

<pre class='propdef'>
Name: flex-basis
Value: content | <<'width'>>
Initial: auto
Applies to: <a>flex items</a>
Inherited: no
Computed value: as specified, with lengths made absolute
Percentages: relative to the <a>flex container’s</a> inner <a>main size</a>
Media: visual
Animation type: length
</pre>

The data block is parsed as a series of lines, with each line composed of one of the propdef headings, a colon, then the value.

The property name will automatically be wrapped in a dfn element. Within the Value line, things that look like grammar nonterminals (anything like <foo>) will be automatically escaped and wrapped in var elements.

This also works for descdef tables, describing the syntax of descriptors. When writing a descdef table, you should additionally add a For line containing the name of the at-rule the descriptor is for.

If you’re defining a partial propdef or descdef (for example, just defining a few new values for an existing property), you can indicate this by adding a "partial" class to the pre. (This will prevent Bikeshed from complaining about lots of missing propdef/descdef lines.)

The format of an elementdef table is a little different. It can contain the following lines:

5.8. Automatic ID Generation

If any heading, issue, or dfn element doesn’t have an id attribute, one will be automatically generated by the processor, to ensure it’s usable as a link target.

Heading IDs are generated directly from the text contents of the element, cleaning up the characters to be a valid id. This often isn’t the best for complex heading texts, so it’s not recommended to rely on this. (Bikeshed will warn you that it’s generating IDs, and suggest you supply one manually.)

If a heading changed significantly, so that you want to change the ID, but you want links to the old heading ID to still work, put the old ID in an oldids="" attribute on the heading element. If there are multiple, comma-separate them.

Issues (elements with class="issue") will generate IDs of the form "issue-###", where "###" is substring of a hash of the issue’s contents. This means that an issue’s ID will be stable against changes elsewhere in the document, including adding or removing issues above it in the source, but will change if you change the contents of the issue.

Definition IDs are also generated directly from the text contents of the element. Most definitions additionally get a prefix, such as "propdef-", to avoid clashes with other definitions.

If an automatically-generated ID would collide with any other ID, it’s automatically de-duped by appending a number to the end. This isn’t very pretty, so if you want to avoid it, supply an ID yourself.

Bikeshed recognizes a fake element named <assert> for marking "assertions" that tests can refer to. In the generated output, this is converted to a <span> with a unique ID generated from its contents, like issues (described above). This ensures that you have a unique ID that won’t change arbitrarily, but will change when the contents of the assertion change, making it easier to tell when a test might no longer be testing the assertion it points to (because it’s no longer pointing to a valid target at all!).

Giving IDs to important things in your document, like headings and definitions, is great, but of little use if people don’t know they can link to them. Bikeshed will automatically generate a "self-link" in the margin next to certain linkable elements which just links to the element, so people can click on the link and then just copy the URL from their address bar to get a link straight to what they care about.

Self-links are currently auto-generated for headings, definitions, and issues, and notes, examples, <li>s, and <dt>s that have been given IDs.

5.10. Remote Issues

As defined earlier, you can start a paragraph with Issue: to cause Bikeshed to automatically format it as an inline issue paragraph. You can also refer to remote issues, which are tracked in some other issue tracker. To do so, instead start your paragraph with Issue(###):, where the ### is some identifying value for the issue.

If the identifying value is of the form user/repo#number, Bikeshed assumes you are referring to GitHub repository, and points the issue at the corresponding issue.

If you have Repository set up to point to a GitHub repository (or it was auto-detected as such, because you’re working on the spec from within one), then a numeric identifying value is assumed to be an issue number for your repository.

Otherwise, you need to tell Bikeshed how to convert the identifying value into a remote issue link. Specify a format string in the Issue Tracker Template metadata, with a {0} in the place where the identifying value should go. Bikeshed will then point the issue at the generated url.

5.11. Including Other Files

Sometimes a spec is too large to easily work with in one file. Sometimes there’s lots of repetitive markup that only changes in a few standard ways. For whatever reason, Bikeshed has the ability to include additional files directly into your spec with a <pre class=include> block:

<pre class=include>
path: relative/to/spec/location
</pre>

The included document is parsed just like if it were written in locally, except that metadata blocks aren’t processed. (For various reasons, they have to be parsed before any other processing occurs). This means that the include file can use markdown, data blocks of various kinds (<pre class=anchors>, <pre class=railroad-diagram>, etc), and both provide definitions for the outer document and refer to ones defined by the outer document.

If you’re including a block of repetitive markup multiple times, and want to vary how it’s displayed, you can pass additional "local" text macros in the block, which are valid only inside the included file:

<pre class=include>
path: template.md
macros:
  foo: bar
  baz: qux qux qux
</pre>

With the above code, you can use [FOO] and [BAZ] macros inside the include file, and they’ll be substituted with "bar" and "qux qux qux", respectively. (Remember that you can mark text macros as optional by appending a ?, like [FOO?], in which case they’ll be replaced with the empty string if Bikeshed can’t find a definition.)

6. Definitions

Defining a term is as easy as wrapping a dfn element around it. Most of the time, this is all you’ll need to do - the definition automatically gains an id, and is usually automatically exposed as an autolink target for local and cross-spec autolinks.

Autolinking is a special mechanism in the processor to let you link terms to their definitions without having to explicitly provide a url. Instead, the text of the link is matched against the text of the definitions, and if a match is found, the link’s href is set up to connect the two.

6.1. Conjugating/Pluralizing/etc the Linking Text

Bikeshed can automatically handle a wide range of English conjugations and pluralizations. For example, if you define the term "snap", you can link to it with "snapping" or "snapped" without having to manually add those variations to your dfn manually.

As such, it’s best to define your term in the "base" form, singular and present tense. Use lt='...' if necessary to set up the correct "base" linking text, if your visible text needs to be in a conjugated form due to the surrounding text.

These variations only work for the last word in a phrase. If you have a longer phrase where it’s a middle word that conjugates differently, you do still have to manually handle that, either by defining multiple linking texts on the dfn, or by manually specifying the linking text on the a.

In addition to English variations, these "conjugations" handle some IDL variations as well. For example, IDL terms that match an IDL keyword must be defined in IDL with a trailing underscore, to avoid grammatical ambiguities, but actually define the term without the underscore. You can link to the term with either syntax.

Similarly, because methods and attributes technically live in the same namespace, it’s safe to link to a method without the parens after its name. (This is useful when linking to a method in the middle of prose, when you might be providing sample arguments that would interfere with linking, or linking to things in the arguments, which would interact badly with the arguments themselves being part of the method’s link text.)

6.2. Changing the Linking Text

Sometimes, the text of the definition isn’t exactly what you want it to be linked by, or you may want it to be linkable with more than one phrase. For example, an algorithm named "Check if three characters would start an identifier" may also want to be linkable from the phrase "starts with an identifier". To alter the linking text, simply add an lt attribute (for "Linking Text") to the definition; the linking text is used instead of the text content. You can separate multiple linking phrases by separating them with the pipe "|" character.

6.3. Defining Extra-Short "Local" Linking Texts

Sometimes you want to use an extra-short version of a term for within a spec, but don’t want to confuse things by exporting it globally. To achieve this, add a local-lt attribute with the terms you want to be only usable within the spec; the syntax is identical to that of the lt attribute, described above.

Using local linking text does not disturb the normal linking-text process; that still takes from either the element text or the lt attribute, as normal.

6.4. Definition Types

All definitions have a definition type. This allows for "namespacing" of the linking text, so you can define, for example, both a property and a term with the same linking text, such as "direction" or "color".

There are several types for CSS values:

There are additional types for WebIDL definitions:

And for HTML/SVG/etc element definitions:

A special type for URL schemes, like "http" or "blob":

A special type for HTTP headers:

A special type just for definitions of operators used in grammar definitions, like || and similar:

And finally, some categories for "English" terms:

The processor will attempt to infer your definition type from the context and text content of the definition:

(This auto-detection is obviously skewed towards CSS types; Bikeshed started as a CSS spec preprocessor, and the CSS types are easier to auto-detect syntactically than anything else.)

Note that this auto-detection is a last-resort operation. There are methods (defined below) to explicitly indicate what type a definition is, and those win over the auto-detection.

If your value doesn’t fit one of these categories, you’ll have to tag it manually. Just add the type as a boolean attribute to the definition, like

  attribute DOMString <dfn attribute for=Foo>name</dfn>;

Alternately, if you’ve got several definitions of the same type that share some container element (such as a <pre> or <dl>), just add a dfn-type="type-goes-here" attribute to the container. Anything which isn’t explicitly tagged otherwise will take that type by default.

(There are more methods to determine definition type, but they’re only meant for legacy content, and so are not documented here.)

6.5. Namespacing a Definition

Some types of definitions are defined relative to a higher construct, such as values for a particularly property, or attributes of a particular IDL interface. This is useful, as it means these names don’t have to be globally unique, but that means your autolinks may have a hard time telling which name you intend to link to.

To fix this, the processor enforces that some types of definitions must define what they are for. This is specified with a for attribute on the definition.

Specifically:

Just like with the definition type, you can instead declare what several definitions are for by putting an attribute on a container. In this case, just add dfn-for to the container. This is especially useful for property/descriptor values, as they’re usually defined in a dl, or IDL definitions, as you can just put a dfn-for on the <pre class='idl'>.

If a single definition is "for" multiple things, you can provide a comma-separated list of values in the attribute.

6.6. Exporting Definitions

Most definitions are automatically "exported", which means they’re made available for other specs to autolink to. The only exception is "dfn" type definitions, which aren’t exported by default.

To force a link to be exported, add an export boolean attribute to it. To force a link not to be exported, add a noexport boolean attribute instead. Like the other attributes, you can instead add this to a container to have it be a default for the definitions inside.

6.7. Providing Custom Definitions

If you want to link to dfns in specs that aren’t yet part of the autolinking database, you can provide your own definition data that Bikeshed can use. Within a <pre class='anchors'> element, define the anchors you need in InfoTree format, with the following keys:

To generate the url for the anchor, first all of the urlPrefix entries are concatenated. If a url is provided, it’s appended to the prefixes; otherwise, the text is url-ified and appended. (Lowercased, spaces converted to dashes, non-alphanumeric characters dropped.) If neither urlPrefix nor url had a "#" character in them, one is inserted between them.

The spec attribute is used only for index generation, and has no effect on URL generation.

Example:

<pre class="anchors">
urlPrefix: https://encoding.spec.whatwg.org/; type: dfn; spec: ENCODING
  text: ascii whitespace
  text: decoder
url: http://www.unicode.org/reports/tr46/#ToASCII; type: dfn; text: toascii
</pre>

<a>ascii whitespace</a> links now!

Alternately, this data can be provided in a file named anchors.bsdata, in the same folder as the spec source, but this prevents you from using the web service.

6.8. Definitions data model

Bikeshed’s most important feature is its powerful cross-spec autolinking. This is possible due to each definition being annotated with a rich set of metadata, which is then exposed via custom attributes and picked up by specialized scrapers (such as Shepherd) that then compile a definition database that Bikeshed relies on.

If you’re writing a spec processor or related tool and would like to interoperate with the Bikeshed ecosystem, here’s the full definition data model and how to properly expose it.

  1. The defining element MUST be a dfn or h2...h6. No other element is recognized as defining a term.

  2. The element MUST have an id attribute.

  3. The linking text defaults to the text content of the dfn/heading. If the desired text content isn’t suitable for linking text, or you wish to provide multiple linking texts, a [lt attribute](#changing-lt) containing one or more pipe-separated linking texts will override the text content. See also §6.3 Defining Extra-Short "Local" Linking Texts

  4. data-dfn-type MUST be provided, and set one of the accepted values. (The dfn element, specifically, actually allows this to be omitted, and defaults to the "dfn" type. But headings require a type, and dfns are clearer with it specified.)

  5. Either data-export or data-noexport MAY be provided (both boolean attributes). If neither is provided, "dfn" type definitions default to noexport, while all others default to export. Unexported definitions aren’t linkable by default.

  6. Several types of definitions are namespaced to another construct; for example, attribute names are namespaced to an interface. These definitions MUST contain a data-dfn-for attribute, containing a comma-separated list of one or more definitions they’re namespaced to.

If you have written a web spec and it conforms to this definition syntax, contact the project maintainer and ask them to register your spec in Shepherd, so its definitions will be available to everyone else.

7. Autolinking

The processor supports "autolinks" for easy linking to terms without having to fiddle around with urls. Instead, just match up the text of the link to the text of the definition!

In its most basic form, autolinks are just a elements without href attributes. The processor takes this as a signal that it should attempt to automatically determine the link target. It compares the text content of the link to the text content of all the definitions in the page or in the cross-ref data, and if it finds a match, automatically sets the href appropriately to point at the relevant definition.

Like definitions, you can override the linking text by setting a lt attribute. Unlike definitions, you can’t separate multiple linking phrases by the bar "|" character, as that doesn’t make sense for links.

Setting an empty lt attribute turns off autolinking entirely, if for whatever reason you need to do so.

There are several additional autolink shorthands for writing an autolink.

The Dfn variety (controlled by Markup Shorthands: dfn yes):

The CSS varieties (controlled by Markup Shorthands: css yes):

The IDL variety (controlled by Markup Shorthands: idl yes):

The markup (HTML/etc) varieties (controlled by Markup Shorthands: markup yes):

The bibliography/spec varieties (controlled by Markup Shorthands: biblio yes):


Any of the above shorthands (besides the biblio varieties) can, if they’re specifying a link type that can have a for value, specify that explicitly by prepending the for value and separating it with a /, like the following to indicate that you want the "bar" attribute of the "Foo" interface (rather than of some other interface):

{{Foo/bar}}

If the for value is itself of a type that can have a for value, you can prepend more specifiers if necessary, like ''@foo/bar/baz'' to refer to the "baz" value for the "bar" descriptor of the "@foo" at-rule or <{ol/type/A}> to refer to the "A" attribute value for the "type" attribute of the "ol" element.

If you need to explicitly refer to the definition instance without a for value (which would be written as <a for="/">foo</a> in normal markup), just use the slash with nothing preceding it, like [=/foo=]. Note, this does not apply to types that require a for value.

Any of the above shorthands (besides the biblio varieties) that encompass multiple types can have their type specified explicitly, by appending the type and separating it with a !!, like the following to indicate that you want the IDL attribute named "bar", rather than the dictionary member of the same name:

{{bar!!attribute}}

Any of the above shorthands (including the biblio varieties) can override their default display text (the term you’re autolinking) with some other explicitly specified text, by appending the new text and separating it with a |, like the following to indicate you want to link to the "do foo" term but display "when foo is done":

[=do foo|when foo is done=]

If both specifying the type and overriding the display text, put the type-specifier first then the desired display text, like:

{{bar!!attribute|the bar attribute}}

Links have the same types as definitions, with a few additional "union" types that are used by the shortcut forms. While you shouldn’t specify them explicitly, they’ll show up in error messages sometimes, so here’s a list of them:

When you actually run the processor, you may get errors about there being too many possible references to choose from. The processor will continue to run anyway, but its default choice might be the wrong definition. There are three things you might have to do to fix these:

  1. Specify the type explicitly, if the link isn’t being processed as the correct type. Like definitions, this can be done by just adding the type as a boolean attribute on the link, or by adding a link-for attribute to a container. If the link is using shorthand syntax, you can use the !!type suffix to specify the type.

  2. If the link type corresponds to one of the definition types that needs for to be specified, you may need to specify for on the link as well to narrow down which definition you’re referring to. For example, many CSS properties define an "auto" value; to link to the "auto" value of the 'width' property in particular, specify <a value for=width>auto</a>, or the shorthand syntax ''width/auto''. To refer to a value of a descriptor, you can be completely explicit and specify the at-rule as well, like <a value for='@counter-style/system'>numeric</a>, but you’re allowed to omit the at-rule if there are no other properties or descriptors with the same name, like ''system/numeric''. This might trigger errors in the future if a conflicting term gets added later, but it keeps your links shorter for now.

    Again, you can specify a link-for attribute on a container to default it for all the autolinks inside the container. Alternately, you can specify link-for-hint on a container, which’ll use the hint as the for value if possible (if doing so wouldn’t eliminate all the possible links). This is useful if some container has a bunch of links for a given property, say, but some of the links are to other things entirely; using link-for means you have to manually specify the other links aren’t for anything, but link-for-hint is more "do what I mean".

  3. If multiple specs define the same term, you may need to declare which spec you’re referring to. (The processor is smart enough to automatically figure out which one you probably want in many cases.) Just add a spec attribute with the spec’s shortname to either the link or a container. This can also be specified document-wide, as described in §7.3 Configuring Linking Defaults. (There is no shorthand syntax for specifying this; if you need to add this to a shorthand autolink, you must first convert it into an explicit a element.)

As a final note, the autolinking algorithm will link differently based on whether the spec being processed is a "current" (up-to-date) or "snapshot" (generated for a past date) draft. If "current" (ED, UD, etc.), it’ll prefer to link to other current drafts, and will only link to "snapshot" if no "current" version of that spec exists. (If a definition only exists in the "snapshot" draft but not the "current" draft, that almost certainly means it’s been deleted since the "snapshot" draft was last published, and thus shouldn’t be linked to.) On the other hand, "official" (WD, CR, etc.) specs will preferentially link to other official specs. A future version of the processor will likely enforce the W3C’s linking policy more strongly: preventing CRs from linking to EDs at all, preventing RECs from linking to anything below CR, etc.

If you need to override the processor’s choice for which status to link to for a particular link, provide a status attribute containing either "ED" or "TR" on the link or a container.

7.2. Linking to Unexported Definitions

Most definition types are automatically exported and made available for cross-linking, but "dfn" type definitions aren’t, because specs often define terms for their own internal use that aren’t meant to be used outside the spec (and in particular, aren’t named in a way so as to avoid collisions).

If a spec contains a "dfn" type definition that you want to link to, but it’s not marked for export (either intentionally, or because it was accidentally missed and fixing the spec would be time-consuming), using the spec attribute (defined above) will override the lack of an export declaration, and go ahead and link to it anyway.

When there are multiple definitions for a given term and Bikeshed can’t automatically tell which one you want, it’ll emit a warning asking you to specify more explicitly. You can do this per-link, but you typically want to make the same choice every time the term is autolinked; this can be done by adding a <pre class='link-defaults'> block, written in the InfoTree format. Each piece of info must have a spec, type, and text line, and optionally a for line if necessary to further disambiguate.

Sometimes this is too fine-grained, and you’d actually like to completely ignore a given spec when autolinking, always preferring to link to something else. To do this, add a <pre class='ignored-specs'> block, written in the InfoTree format. Each piece of info must have a spec line, and optionally a replacedBy line, both naming specs. If the info has just a spec line, that spec is ignored totally by default; linking to it requires you to manually specify a spec="" attribute on the autolink. If the info has a replacedBy line, then whenever an autolink has a choice between the two specs, it’ll delete the spec value from consideration, leaving only the replacedBy value (plus any other specs that might be providing a definition).

7.4. Potentially-ambiguous for-less Links

If you were directed here by a Bikeshed error message, put an explicit for value on your autolink. (Use for="/" to link to a definition without a for value of its own).

Bikeshed’s autolinking functions as a series of filters, some of which are optional. For example, if you don’t specify a for value, then Bikeshed simply doesn’t care about the for values of definitions as it searches. However, this doesn’t always match people’s mental models—in particular, people sometimes implicitly assume that an autolink without a for will specifically match a definition without a for.

Usually this is fine; if there are multiple possible definitions, Bikeshed will just throw up a linking error informing you of how to be more specific. But if you have a definition of that term with a for value in your local spec (or your anchors block), Bikeshed can silently select that as the correct definition to link to, causing accidental spec corruption if you meant to link to a cross-spec definition without a for.

In other words, if some other spec defines <dfn>term</dfn>, and then your spec both defines <dfn for=foo>term</dfn> and links to <a>term</a> (expecting the link to go to the cross-spec definition), you’ll be disappointed, but won’t know it’s wrong unless you manually check your links.

Bikeshed looks out for this situation, and flags it as a potentially-ambiguous link, requiring you to specify the for value explicitly. If you want to link to the for-less cross-spec definition, simply add for="/" to your autolink, to indicate explicitly that you want the definition without a for value. Otherwise, add the appropriate for value as normal.

Sometimes you want to link to a section of a document, rather than a specific definition. Bikeshed has section links to handle this case more easily:

[[#heading-id]]

renders as:

<a href="#heading-id">§6.1 The Example Section</a>

Note that this is quite different from normal autolinks; rather than matching on text and letting Bikeshed fill in the href, you match on href and let Bikeshed fill in the text. This is because section titles change much more often than definition texts, so using text-based matching is fragile; on the other hand, their IDs tend to be stable, as they’re often linked to. Also, the section titles are often long and annoying to type, and they move around, so numbering isn’t stable.

You can also use cross-spec section links, as long as the spec is either in Bikeshed’s linking database, or the biblio database. The syntax is a mixture of a biblio reference and a section link:

[[css-flexbox-1#auto-margins]]
[[CSS-access-19990804#Features]]

which renders as:

<a href="https://drafts.csswg.org/css-flexbox-1/#auto-margins">CSS Flexbox 1 §8.1 Aligning with auto margins</a>
<a href="http://www.w3.org/1999/08/NOTE-CSS-access-19990804#Features">Accessibility Features of CSS §Features</a>

If Bikeshed knows about the spec, it link-checks you, and fills in the section number and heading in the generated text. If the spec is only in the bibliography database, Bikeshed just assumes that the link target exists and uses it directly in the text, because it has no way to tell what the section is named.

If the spec is multipage, like SVG, and Bikeshed knows about it, most of the time you don’t need to do anything different - Bikeshed will find the correct page for the heading you’re linking to. On the rare occasions that the same heading id exists in multiple pages of the same spec, tho, specify the page like [[svg/intro#toc]] (which indicates the #toc heading on the intro.html page). If the desired heading is on the top-level page, use an empty page name, like [[html/#living-standard]]. In any case, Bikeshed will throw an error, and tell you what names it knows about so you can easily correct your link.

8. Bibliography

Bibliographical references form a special class of autolinks. They’re typically added only via the shorthands [[FOO]] for informative references and [[!FOO]] for normative references.

Some biblio entries come with multiple sets of urls; at present, Bikeshed tracks a single "current" url and a single "snapshot" url. In the W3C, for example, this maps to Editors Drafts and things in /TR space, respectively. You can specify which url to use by specifying "current" or "snapshot" within the biblio shorthand, like [[FOO current]], or specify the default url to choose for all your biblio refs with the Default Ref Status.

If, for whatever reason, you need to craft a bibliography link manually, add data-link-type=biblio, data-biblio-type=[normative | informative], and data-biblio-status=[current | snapshot] attributes to the link.

Unlike regular autolinks, which link to dfn elements, biblio autolinks cause the spec to generate entries in its "References" section, and then link to that instead.

The bibliography database is completely separate from the autolinking database, and comes from multiple sources. The default data comes from the SpecRef project and the CSSWG’s own biblio file (preferring SpecRef’s information when the same name appears in both).

You can also add your own bibliography data, following the SpecRef JSON format:

{
	"foo-bar": {
		"authors": [
			"Tab Atkins",
			"Dirk Schultze"
		],
		"href": "http://www.w3.org/TR/foo-bar/",
		"title": "Foo Bar Level 1",
		"status": "CR",
		"publisher": "W3C",
		"deliveredBy": [
			"http://www.w3.org/html/wg/"
		]
	}
}

Only the "title" field is strictly necessary; the rest can be omitted if desired.

This JSON should be inline, in a <pre class=biblio> block. It can also be in a biblio.json file in the same folder as the spec file, but this is incompatible with the web service.

8.1. Linking and Automatic Biblio Entries

Whenever you autolink to another spec, Bikeshed automatically assumes this is a significant, normative reference, and adds a bibliography entry for the spec automatically.

However, if the link is in a "non-normative" element, Bikeshed doesn’t put it in the bibliography. This includes any notes (class=note), examples (class=example), or sections manually marked with class=non-normative. (You can override this and get a normative reference by adding a class=normative to the link or an ancestor.)

9. IDL Processing

Bikeshed can automatically process IDL blocks, marking up all relevant terms for you without any intervention, setting up definitions and autolinks as appropriate.

To activate this behavior, simply place the IDL in the <pre class='idl'> element. Bikeshed will consume the text content of the element (ignoring any markup you may currently have) and replace it with marked-up text containing dfn and a elements.

As mentioned in §5.6.2 xmp To Avoid Escaping Markup, you can use <xmp class=idl> as well, so you don’t have to escape your sequence<Foo>/etc types. This prevents you from using other markup in your IDL, but that’s relatively rare.

For IDL specifically, you can also use <script type=idl>. This has similar effects to <xmp>, but it interacts better with the syntax-highlighting of some text editors, preventing the contents from being highlighted as HTML.

In the process of doing this, Bikeshed will also syntax-check your IDL, and report fatal errors for any mistakes. Bikeshed’s IDL parser, courtesy of Peter Linss, is intended to be forward-compatible with IDL changes, gracefully emitting unknown constructs unchanged and recovering as well as it can. If anything isn’t recognized when it should be, or the parser fails in a major, non-graceful way, please report it as an issue.

9.1. Putting Definitions Elsewhere

Quite often, you may want to have the actual definition of an IDL term (the thing that Bikeshed actually links to) somewhere in your prose near the full definition, rather than being in the IDL block.

Bikeshed will automatically produce an a in your IDL, rather than a dfn, if it can find a pre-existing definition of that IDL term, including local definitions in the current spec. However, you have to mark up the definition correctly to get this to work, or else Bikeshed will fail to recognize there’s an external definition and will mark up the IDL with a dfn as well.

In particular, method and attribute definitions need to have their for value set to the interface they’re a part of (and similar with dictionary members). Methods have some further complexity - they should have their definition text set to contain the names of all their arguments.

For example, take the following example IDL:

interface Foo {
	void bar(DOMString baz, optional long qux);
};

To have Bikeshed recognize a definition for the bar() method placed elsewhere, it must look something like <dfn method for=Foo title="bar(baz, qux)">bar(DOMString baz, optional long qux)</dfn>.

Additionally, it should define alternate linking texts for omittable arguments, like <dfn method for=Foo title="bar(baz, qux)|bar(baz)">bar(DOMString baz, optional long qux)</dfn>. This way any valid call signature can be used to autolink. Note that arguments are omittable if they’re marked with optional, or are variadic (like long... qux), or have a default value. Nullable arguments (like long? qux) are not omittable. (If you are fine with the dfn being in the IDL block, Bikeshed will do all of this for you.)

Unless all arguments can be omitted, the definition text should not have an alternative with empty args. For convenience, however, Bikeshed will allow autolinks with empty argument lists to work, as long as it can resolve the link unambiguously. For example, {{Foo/bar()}} will autolink to the method defined above, despite it not being a valid call signature, as long as there isn’t an overload of bar() that it might also apply to.

(The above applies to all functionish types: method, constructor, stringifier, etc.)

Marking up argument definitions is similar. To mark up the baz argument of the above method, for example, do <dfn argument for="Foo/bar(baz, qux)">baz</dfn>. You should use the full call signature of the method.

9.2. Linking to Stringifiers

Linking to a stringifier is a little complicated, because WebIDL allows four different syntaxes for it.

The stringifier keyword itself is always linkable; it’s a "dfn" type definition with for=MyInterface and linking text "stringification behavior". Like any other IDL construct, you can instead define the term yourself in the same way, and the IDL will link to your definition instead, like <dfn dfn for=MyInterface>stringification behavior</dfn>. This is generally what you should use to link to the stringifier, as it’ll maintain the links even if you change which syntax form you use.

If you use the "stringifier attribute" form, like stringifier attribute DOMString href;, you can also just link/dfn the attribute as normal.

If you use the "stringifier method" form, like stringifier DOMString foo(long bar);, you can also just link/dfn the method as normal, like <dfn stringifier for=MyInterface>foo(bar)</dfn>. (Note that it’s a "stringifier" type definition, not "method".)

If you use the "anonymous stringifer method" form, like stringifier DOMString(long bar), you can still technically link/dfn it as a stringifier method. It doesn’t have a name, so we invent one - it’s called __stringifier__(), a la Python’s magic methods. (Note the two underscores on each side.) You should almost never need to do this; the only reason to need to specify the method name (rather than just linking to the keyword, as described above) is if you’re linking/dfning an argument to the method, and need to specify a for value for it.

9.3. Turning Off Processing

If for whatever reason you don’t want your IDL block to be processed by Bikeshed, simply use another element, or another class. If you really want to use <pre class=idl>, you can add a data-no-idl attribute to the element. Bikeshed will leave these elements alone.

Alternately, if your block is IDL, but it’s not meant to be taken literally (for example, if it shows an example attribute, then explains in prose the set of actual attribute names to be used, as in the _camel_cased_attribute in CSSOM), put a class=extract on it.

10. Boilerplate Generation

The processor automatically generates nearly all of a spec’s boilerplate, the text that is repeated nearly identically across all specs.

Generally, you won’t need to understand what’s going on here in order to use the processor - it’ll just automatically do the right thing.

For help in creating new boilerplate files for your organization, see §10.7 Creating New Boilerplate Files For Your Organization.

10.1. Groups

Much of the boilerplate is determined based on the Group metadata. If unspecified, it defaults to a generic set of boilerplate that is generally appropriate for most things, without making reference to any particular standards body or the like. However, to obtain correct boilerplate for a given standards body, "Group" can be used.

Several groups are already accommodated with appropriate inclusion files:

You can put whatever value you want into the "Group" value, though. Unrecognized values will just use the default boilerplate files. If you want to add specialized boilerplate files for your group, check out the File-Based Includes section, later in this document, and write your own files.

10.2. Rearranging and Excluding "Spec Metadata"

An important part of the boilerplate is the "spec-metadata" section. This will likely be at the top of your header boilerplate, as it contains a bunch of useful information about your spec.

Bikeshed generates a lot of these automatically for you, based on the metadata you provide and other things detected from your document, and you can supply "custom" items as specified near the end of §4 Metadata. There’s a predefined ordering of these, but if you’d like a slightly different order, or to omit some of the automatically-generated items, you can use Metadata Include and Metadata Order to control this.

Metadata Include takes a comma-separated list of names and boolish values, where the names are the strings that show up in the dt in the spec metadata. Everything defaults to "on" currently, but you can explicitly turn them "off" to omit them from the spec metadata section.

Metadata Order instead controls the ordering of the spec metadata section. It’s a comma-separated list of names, where the names are the strings that show up in the dt in the spec metadata (same as Metadata Include). Two special "names" are recognized as well: the * name stands in for "all the standard keys that aren’t otherwise explicitly specified", while !* stands in for "all the custom keys that aren’t otherwise explicitly specified". (The default value is thus Metadata Order: *, !*, listing all the standard keys in the default order, followed by all the custom keys in the default order.)

If a name is specially pluralized when there are multiple entries (such as "Editor" vs "Editors"), use the singular version in either of these metadatas.

For example, Metadata Include: This version off will make Bikeshed omit the "This version" entry from the spec-metadata section, which is otherwise auto-generated by the ED metadata.

If you wanted to make sure that editors were listed before anything else, you could set Metadata Order: Editor, *, !*.

10.3. Text Macros

Several text "macros" are defined by the spec’s metadata, and can be used anywhere in the spec to substitute in the spec they stand for by using the syntax [FOO]. Note that this is similar to the syntax for bibliography references, but it has only a single set of [] characters, and the text must be uppercase. The following macros are defined:

As these are substituted at the text level, not the higher HTML level, you can use them anywhere, including in attribute values.

You can mark a macro as "optional" by appending a ? to its name, like [DATE?]. This will cause Bikeshed to just remove it (replace it with the empty string) if it can’t find a definition, rather than throwing an error.

Like most other markup shorthands, text macros can be "escaped" by prepending a backslash, like \[TITLE]. When Bikeshed sees this, it will remove the slash and leave the text alone. This is sometimes necessary when code examples in your doc (such as a regex) accidentally look like text macros.

10.4. Boilerplate Sections

The location of the boilerplate sections are indicated by elements with data-fill-with='' attributes. If the elements contain anything, they’re emptied before being filled with the appropriate boilerplate. The valid data-fill-with='' values are:

Additionally, "header" and "footer" boilerplate files are used to put content at the start and end of your document. Most or all of the above boilerplate sections should actually show up here, in the header and footer, rather than being manually specified in your source file.

10.4.1. Default Boilerplate

Some sections listed above are generated by default; if you don’t put an explicitly data-fill-with container in your document, they’ll generate anyway (if they have anything to fill themselves with), appending themselves to the end of the body. These sections are:

Again, these will only auto-generate if there is something for them to do; if your spec doesn’t define any CSS properties, for example, the "property-index" boilerplate won’t generate. If you want to suppress their generation even when they do have something to do, use the Boilerplate metadata, like:

<pre class="metadata">
Boilerplate: property-index no
</pre>

10.4.2. Overriding Boilerplate

Sometimes a file-based boilerplate (see below) that is appropriate for most of the specs in your group isn’t quite right for your specific spec. Any boilerplate, file-based or Bikeshed-generated, can be overriden by custom text of your choosing. Just add an element to your source document with the content you’d like to show up in place of the offending boilerplate, and add a boilerplate="foo" attribute to the container, specifying which boilerplate section is being replaced.

Bikeshed will automatically remove that element from you document, and instead inject its contents in place of the boilerplate that it would normally provide.

10.5. Table of Contents

The headings in the spec are automatically numbered, and a table of contents automatically generated.

Any heading h2 to h6 (that is, skipping only the document-titling h1) is automatically numbered by having a <span class='secno'>...</span> prepended to its contents. You can avoid this behavior for a heading and all of its subsequent subheadings by adding class="no-num" to the heading.

Similarly, a ToC is generated to match. Headings and their subheadings can be omitted from the ToC by adding class="no-toc" to them.

The processor assumes that your headings are numbered correctly. It does not yet pay attention to the HTML outline algorithm, so using a bunch of h1s nested in sections will have very wrong effects.

Headings also automatically gain a self-link pointing to themselves, to enable people to easily link to sections without having to return to the ToC.

10.6. File-based Includes

Several of the data-fill-with values (those that are static, rather than generated from in-document data) actually come from sets of .include files in the include/ directory.

The base files are simply named "foo.include", where "foo" is the name of the data-fill-with value. They can be specialized, however, to particular working groups, and to particular document statuses.

Putting the boilerplate in a folder named after the group, like csswg/header.include, specializes it for that group (specified in the spec’s metadata). Adding a "-STATUS" to the filename specializes it for the status (same). These can be used together, like "csswg/status-CR.include".

The processor will first look for the "group/foo-STATUS.include" file, failing over to "group/foo.include", then "foo-STATUS.include", and finally "foo.include".

10.7. Creating New Boilerplate Files For Your Organization

Bikeshed’s default boilerplate generates a functional and reasonably attractive spec, but if your group has specific style requirements, you can produce your own boilerplate files. This section is a basic guide to developing these files.

The most important part of the boilerplate is the header.include and footer.include file. These define the parts of the spec HTML that precede and follow your actual spec content, so the source file can contain only the actual spec text, and all specs in the same organization can look similar.

Here is a basic example header.include file:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  <title>Bikeshed Documentation</title>
  <style>
  ...
  </style>
</head>
<body class="h-entry">
<div class="head">
  <p data-fill-with="logo"></p>
  <h1 id="title" class="p-name no-ref">Bikeshed Documentation</h1>
  <h2 id="subtitle" class="no-num no-toc no-ref">Living Standard,
	<span class="dt-updated"><span class="value-title" title="20171124">24 November 2017</span></h2>
  <div data-fill-with="spec-metadata"></div>
  <div data-fill-with="warning"></div>
  <p class='copyright' data-fill-with='copyright'></p>
  <hr title="Separator for header">
</div>

<h2 class='no-num no-toc no-ref' id='abstract'>Abstract</h2>
<div class="p-summary" data-fill-with="abstract"></div>
<div data-fill-with="at-risk"></div>

<nav data-fill-with="table-of-contents" id="toc"></nav>

This uses several of Bikeshed’s boilerplating features:

11. Railroad Diagrams

A railroad diagram is a particular way of visually representing a structure roughly equivalent to regular expressions, or simple grammars. They tend to be more readable and easier to grok than their equivalents written in terse regexps, and smaller than their equivalents written in explicit parsers.

Here’s an example of a railroad diagram, this one describing the syntax of valid IDENT tokens in CSS:

-- -- - - a-z A-Z _ or non-ASCII a-z A-Z _ or non-ASCII escape escape a-z A-Z 0-9 _ - or non-ASCII a-z A-Z 0-9 _ - or non-ASCII escape escape

Bikeshed supports the automatic generation of railroad diagrams from a simplified DSL. To use, simply embed a diagram description in a <pre class='railroad'> element - it’ll get replaced by an appropriate svg element.

11.1. The Diagram Language

Diagrams are described by a custom DSL that somewhat resembles Python.

A railroad diagram consists of a number of nested elements, each of which may contain multiple children. Each element is specified as a command followed by a colon, possibly followed by additional data (the prelude), and the element’s children indented on following lines, like:

T: /*
ZeroOrMore:
	N: anything but * followed by /
T: */

This draws the following diagram:

/* /* anything but * followed by / anything but * followed by / */ */

The top-level elements are assumed to be a sequence of elements in the diagram. Inside of a diagram, any of the elements may be used. Elements are split into two groups: containers and text.

The containers hold other elements, and modify their semantics:

12. Source-File Processing: bikeshed source

Sometimes it’s the source file you want to preprocess, if there is some feature you want literally in your source that is hard or annoying to type in yourself. Bikeshed has some options for doing this as well.

All of these commands are accessed from the source sub-command, like bikeshed source. You can run individual commands by specifying their relevant flag (see bikeshed source -h for a list), or run all of them by not passing any flags.

12.1. Big Text

When editing a large spec, it’s easy to get lost in its length, and have to spend some time scrolling back and forth to find particular sections.

The Sublime Text editor has a special feature, the minimap, which shows an extremely-zoomed out version of your document while you scroll, so you can recognize where you are in the file by the shape of your code. This can be made even easier by putting extra-large "ASCII art" text in your source to label major sections, so they show up visibly in the minimap as section markers.

Bikeshed can auto-generate this "ASCII art" text for you with its --big-text command. Just add an HTML comment to your document on its own line that looks like:

<!-- Big Text: Your Text -->

If you run bikeshed source --big-text, Bikeshed will replace it with a comment that looks like:

<!--
██    ██  ███████  ██     ██ ████████        ████████ ████████ ██     ██ ████████
 ██  ██  ██     ██ ██     ██ ██     ██          ██    ██        ██   ██     ██
  ████   ██     ██ ██     ██ ██     ██          ██    ██         ██ ██      ██
   ██    ██     ██ ██     ██ ████████           ██    ██████      ███       ██
   ██    ██     ██ ██     ██ ██   ██            ██    ██         ██ ██      ██
   ██    ██     ██ ██     ██ ██    ██           ██    ██        ██   ██     ██
   ██     ███████   ███████  ██     ██          ██    ████████ ██     ██    ██
-->

Which is clearly visible from Sublime’s minimap!

Appendix A: Bikeshed’s "InfoTree" Format

Bikeshed’s custom text formats attempt to be fairly regular; most of them involve specifying key/value pairs, and are line-based. For example, Bikeshed’s metadata format is one key/value pair per line, with a colon between the key and the value.

The InfoTree format, used by several things in Bikeshed, is similar. It’s used when you need to specify data consistenting of multiple key/value pairs, where it’s common that multiple entries share some of that data. The InfoTree format makes this easy to read, write, and maintain.

Specifying Information on a Single Line

The simplest way to provide a piece of information is by putting all the key/value pairs on a single line. In the InfoTree format, this is done by putting a colon between the key and value, and separating the pairs with semicolons. For example, here is an example of two "anchor" entries:

urlPrefix: https://encoding.spec.whatwg.org/; type: dfn; text: ascii whitespace
urlPrefix: https://encoding.spec.whatwg.org/; type: dfn; text: utf-8

This specifies two entries, each with three keys: urlPrefix, type, and text.

Nesting Information to Share Pieces

When multiple pieces of information share some key/value pairs, you can use nesting to indicate this, so you don’t have to repeat yourself. Here’s the same two entries as before, but using nesting to share their common information:

urlPrefix: https://encoding.spec.whatwg.org/; type: dfn
	text: ascii whitespace
	text: utf-8

Just like the previous, this defines two entries, each with three key/value pairs. Now it’s clearer, though, that the two entries share their urlPrefix and type data, and you only have to maintain the common data in one place.

Comments

A line that starts with a # character (with any amount of preceding whitespace) is a comment; it will be completely ignored for the purpose of parsing.

Additional Details

The order that keys are specified in is irrelevant. Feel free to rearrange them for readability or more effective nesting.

You can specify the same key multiple times; the values will be collected into an array for later processing. (Each user of InfoTree will define whether multiple values for a key is valid or not, and what it means.) The order that the values appear in is preserved, as it might be important. (For example, in the anchor format, multiple urlPrefix values are concatenated together, to help specify urls in multipage specs.)

Additional semicolons are silently ignored; in other words, empty entries get dropped, so you can put a final semicolon at the end of the line or not, as you prefer.

Conformance

Conformance requirements are expressed with a combination of descriptive assertions and RFC 2119 terminology. The key words “MUST”, “MUST NOT”, “REQUIRED”, “SHALL”, “SHALL NOT”, “SHOULD”, “SHOULD NOT”, “RECOMMENDED”, “MAY”, and “OPTIONAL” in the normative parts of this document are to be interpreted as described in RFC 2119. However, for readability, these words do not appear in all uppercase letters in this specification.

All of the text of this specification is normative except sections explicitly marked as non-normative, examples, and notes. [RFC2119]

Examples in this specification are introduced with the words “for example” or are set apart from the normative text with class="example", like this:

This is an example of an informative example.

Informative notes begin with the word “Note” and are set apart from the normative text with class="note", like this:

Note, this is an informative note.

Index

Terms defined by this specification

Terms defined by reference

References

Normative References

[HTML]
Anne van Kesteren; et al. HTML Standard. Living Standard. URL: https://html.spec.whatwg.org/multipage/
[RFC2119]
S. Bradner. Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate Requirement Levels. March 1997. Best Current Practice. URL: https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2119
[SVG2]
Nikos Andronikos; et al. Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) 2. 15 September 2016. CR. URL: https://www.w3.org/TR/SVG2/

Issues Index

Define the issues-list format. The -t output is already more than enough to actually work with, but it would still be good to describe it more fully.